UH Students Build Robotic Vessel to Help in Times of Disaster

One day soon, technology developed by University of Hawaiʻi researchers and students, may be in harbors and ports all over the world providing daily security and surveillance, along with life saving inspections after natural disasters or terrorist attacks.

The technology is an unmanned port security vessel.

The six-foot long, four and half-foot wide, 160-pound robotic platform also has a high-resolution camera and real time video. It can be deployed rapidly and operated from miles away while providing critical, up-to-the-second information to first responders for maritime security. The idea came from Hawaiʻi based Coast Guard units sent to Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina.

The six-foot long, four and half-foot wide, 160-pound robotic platform also has a high-resolution camera and real time video. It can be deployed rapidly and operated from miles away while providing critical, up-to-the-second information to first responders for maritime security.
The idea came from Hawaiʻi based Coast Guard units sent to Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina.

“This is a system that can go in as a robot, keep people at a safe distance, and be able to tell you where it is safe to operate and where it is not safe to operate,” said Margo Edwards, director of Department of Homeland Security National Center for Island, Maritime and Extreme Environmental Security, also known as CIMES, which is based out of UH Mānoa.

“It uses sonar, chemical sensors and infrared cameras,” explains Brian Bingham, an assistant professor at the UH Mānoa College of Engineering. “And it surveys autonomously, in an unmanned fashion, it surveys the harbors.”

More Here: Robotic vessel helps in times of disaster

 

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