Public Invited to the Ocean Day Mālama Kanaloa Festival

The public is invited to the 7th annual University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Ocean Day Mālama Kanaloa Festival on Sunday, March 9, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hilo’s Bayfront Beach Park.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

This free, event is hosted by the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo’s Pacific Island Programs for Exploring Science (PIPES) in partnership with the County of Hawaiʻi, EPSCoR Hawaiʻi IMUA III, UH Hilo Student Activities Council, UH Hilo Student Association, Board of Media Broadcasting, Board of Student Publications, and the University of Hawai’i Sea Grant.

Since its debut as Ocean Day in 2007, the festival has become a popular community event, drawing crowds in excess of 2,000 participants. Volunteer Coordinator Amelie Sterling says the event also serves as an important learning resource for students.

“Ocean Day is a great volunteer opportunity for students to gain a service learning experience as well as enhance their resumes and build skills for the future,” Sterling said. “Some faculty members even offer it as an opportunity for students to gain extra credit or fulfill a community service requirement within their course.”

The Ocean Day Mālama Kanaloa Festival is focused on increasing awareness of ocean and coastal issues such as conservation, sustainable use of resources and ocean safety through interactive displays, activities and booths. Activities include fishing games, marine critter touch tanks, craft making, makahiki games, face painting, poi-pounding, seed planting, marine debris displays, and more. The event also showcases ongoing research while providing opportunities to interact with people interested in working together to care for island and ocean communities.

For more information, email: UHpipes@hawaii.edu or call Amelie Sterling at 933-0707.

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Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Middle School Band & Keiki Choir California Schedule

The Kamehameha Schools Hawai’i Middle School Band & Keiki Choir will be performing in California over the Spring Break.  Here is their schedule of public performances.
California Flier

Please feel free to forward this to your friend’s and ʻohana that live in the area. We would love to see them and I am sure they would enjoy the mele of Hawaiʻi brought to them by our Keiki.

Volunteers Needed to Malama Maunakea

The Office of Mauna Kea Management (OMKM) is seeking community volunteers to participate in its monthly “Malama Maunakea” campaign to protect the mountain’s fragile resources.  Community members are encouraged to sign up for open volunteer days – Saturday, April 19; Saturday, June 7 or Saturday, July 26.

Volunteers work to help Malama Maunakea along with Office of Mauna Kea Management

Volunteers work to help Malama Maunakea along with Office of Mauna Kea Management

“Our overarching goal at the Office of Mauna Kea Management is to malama Maunakea. Taking care of 12,000 acres is a daunting task, but with collaborative community partnerships we can accomplish much,” stated OMKM Director Stephanie Nagata. “We are so thankful to the school groups, service organizations, Chambers, individual and families of volunteers who give of their weekend to take care of Maunakea.”

The invasive species weed pulls throughout 2013 proved to be quite successful with 236 participants volunteering 1,747 hours, pulling 363 garbage bags of invasive weeds on eight separate occasions and also planting 200 Maunakea silversword.

The Saturday weed pulls concentrate on eradicating the invasive fireweed (Senecio madagascariensis) along the Mauna Kea Access Road and around Halepohaku at approximately 9,200’ elevation.  The fireweed pulls help keep this invasive species from being transported to the upper elevation areas of Maunakea and reduce habitat for invasive insects.

The Malama Maunakea volunteer day begins at 8 am.  For Hilo-based volunteers, transportation to and from Hilo is provided. For West Hawaii volunteers, OMKM will help coordinate ride sharing. Upon arrival at Halepohaku, the volunteers are given a project orientation and allowed time to acclimate to the high elevation. Invasive weed pulls focus on the area along the Mauna Kea Access Road near Halepohaku. A brief tour of Maunakea resources completes this fulfilling day on the mountain.

Who can help? Everyone, including families and kids under parent supervision, student groups 16 years of age and older, community members, visitors, are all welcome.  Space is limited. To volunteer or for more information contact OMKM Natural Resource Program Manager Fritz Klasner at 808-933-3194 or email: OMKMvolunteers-grp@hawaii.edu.

Bill to Make Hawaiian Bobtail Squid Hawaii’s Official State Microbe to be Heard Tomorrow

The Hawaiian Bobtail Squid – a two inch, glow in the dark creature – will have its moment in the spotlight tomorrow afternoon, Tuesday, February 25. The Senate’s Committee on Technology and the Arts (TEC) will hear a bill designating vibrio fischeri as Hawaii’s official microbe.

image credit: guardian.co.uk

Image credit: guardian.co.uk

Vibrio fischeri is a bacteria which lives in a symbiotic relationship with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, giving the animal the power to produce bioluminescence, or light from a living organism. The squid is endemic to Hawaii and hunts at night on reef flats. However, moonlight casts a shadow onto the sea floor, which alerts predators to the squid’s presence. To counter this effect, the Hawaiian bobtail squid cultures vibrio fischeri in a special light-emitting organ, which allows it to become stealthy by projecting light that minimizes the dark shadow of its body.

Image credit: kahikai.org

Image credit: kahikai.org

The study of this chemical reaction has numerous medical and practical applications, such as testing for toxic compounds in water.

“We anticipate having a State Microbe will ignite interest in science for our kids. What could be more appropriate than a bacteria that creates a glowing blue squid that thrives just off our shores,” says Sen. Glenn Wakai, Chairman of the TEC Committee, “With 70% of our planet covered in water, it makes perfect sense to have Hawaii’s microbe tied to the ocean.”

Image credit: news.wisc.edu

Image credit: news.wisc.edu

What:   Hearing on SB 3124, designating a State Microbe

When: 1:15 p.m., Tuesday, February 25

Where: Capitol, room 414

More information on the bill can be found by going to this link: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=SB&billnumber=3124&year=2014.

Oregon became the first state to have an official microbe.  Lawmakers there designated saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as “brewer’s yeast” as its state microbe due to its importance to Oregon’s beer and winemaking industries. Wisconsin has attempted to turn lactococcus lactis into its official microbe, in recognition of its role in creating cheese.

Crafts and Entertainment at Annual Spring Fundraiser at Hulihe’e Palace

The picturesque, seaside grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace will be the location of the annual spring fundraiser, Day at Hulihe‘e, on Saturday, Mar. 29. An 8:30 a.m. traditional Hawaiian blessing kicks off the 9 a.m.-4 p.m. event, which is hosted by palace caretakers the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins.

Hula Dancers dance behind Hulihe'e Palace. (Photo Fern Gavalek)

Hula Dancers dance behind Hulihe’e Palace. (Photo Fern Gavalek)

Browse among tented arts and crafts booths, a tempting bake sale featuring Aunty Nona’s scrumptious peach cake and the ever-popular Classy Tutu’s Attic. Choose a fresh flower lei made on site by palace volunteers. The Kuakini Hawaiian Civic Club will offer ono food and local hula halau will provide cultural entertainment.

New this year are cultural demonstrations including pa‘i ‘ai (poi pounding) and ‘upena (fish net making). Prize drawings throughout the day will be featured, including the chance to win a king-sized Hawaiian quilt for a $5 donation.

Palace admission will be complimentary all day, although donations will be accepted.

Hulihe'e Palace

Hulihe’e Palace

Day at Hulihe‘e remembers Hawai‘i’s Citizen Prince who was born in March: Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole (1871-1922.) Hawai‘i observes an annual state holiday to commemorate Prince Kuhio’s dedication toward serving his people; it’s Wednesday, Mar. 26 in 2014.

Beginning in 1902, Kuhio served as a delegate to the U.S. Congress for 10 terms, was the driving force behind the development of Pearl Harbor and instituted the Hawaiian Homestead Commission. A monument at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park credits Prince Kuhio for founding the park in 1916.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays- Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hawaiian Family AfFair to Honor Na Pua No`eau Alumni

Na Pua No`eau, the Center for Gifted and Talented Native Hawaiian Children, is calling on all of its former students to come and be recognized at this year’s 22nd Annual Hawaiian Family AfFair.

UH Hilo Moniker

The free, public event will be held on the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo campus on Saturday, March 1, from 9- 3 p.m. This year’s theme is “E Ola Koa: Living long and strong like a koa tree in the forest.”

Activities include various exhibit booths, free health screenings, a keiki fitness center, arts and crafts booths, make and take workshops, entertainment, food booths, and more.

More than 16,000 Native Hawaiian children from across the State and around the globe have participated in a Na Pua No`eau activity since its first event was held in 1990. The Center provides educational enrichment that guides students to learn through the Hawaiian culture.

“The best way to describe the program’s impact on students is that the students create a healthy life and lifestyle for themselves, their family and their community,” said Executive Director Dr. David Sing. “The Center helps them define and understand themselves as Hawaiians and to build a future that acknowledges and embraces who they are in the evolving world.”

Sing said the Center wants to celebrate the lives its alumni have made for themselves, their families and community. Approximately 18-percent of the native Hawaiian students currently attending UH Hilo and 17-percent attending Hawaiʻi Community College are products of the Na Pua No`eau pipeline.

For more information, call 974-7678.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Update

Kahaualeʻa 2 flow still active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō

View of the flow front of the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow, looking west. The flow front has focused into a new lobe that is slowly migrating through thick forest, triggering scattered forest fires. The smoke from these fires seems to be “seeding” the cloud above it. The active flow front was 7.4 km (4.6 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Mauna Loa can be seen in the distance.

Top: Looking northeast from Puʻu ʻŌʻō, the smoke coming from forest fires at the front of the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow can be seen in the distance. In the foreground, thick fume is coming from the Kahaualeʻa 2 lava tube, which is supplying lava to the flow front. Bottom: View of the northeast spatter cone in Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. This small cone is also the vent area for the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow. The cone has recently hosted a small lava pond, but today this seemed to be crusted over. See the time-lapse sequences below to see recent activity at this cone.

Thermal image of the front of the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow. Yellow and white areas depict active breakouts, while red areas are cooler, inactive portions of the flow. Over the past week a new lobe has pushed east, between lobes that were active in November and January. The tip of this new lobe was 7.4 km (4.6 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Compare this view to the February 20 map (see link above).

Spattering and gas pistoning in the northeast cone in Puʻu ʻŌʻō

This selection of images shows activity at the northeast spatter cone in Puʻu ʻŌʻō over the past two weeks. The lava pond was undergoing gas pistoning, a gradual buildup and release of gas in the lava pond that is often associated with spattering and lava level changes. For scale, the lava pond is about 10 m (30 feet) across.

More images of the northeast spatter cone in Puʻu ʻŌʻō, taken with a time-lapse camera.

This Quicktime movie shows a time-lapse sequence of activity at the northeast spatter cone in Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater on February 9-10. Rapid fluctuations in the height of the lava pond are caused by gas pistoning, which is the gradual buildup and release of gas in the pond. Mauna Kea is visible in the upper right portion of the frame. The sequence was captured by an inexpensive time-lapse camera, whose plastic housing was warped by the extreme heat.

Senator Malama Solomon on the Hawaii Business News “Geothermal Article”

Senator Malama Solomon responded to the following Hawaii Business News article:

Click to read article

Click to read article

Your report on geothermal energy (HB November 2013, “Geothermal is a Red-Hot Topic”) failed to make some very important points about why geothermal would improve the quality of life for all of us in Hawaii.

• Geothermal is used worldwide and can be applied to Hawaii. According to the state’s Department of Land and Natural Resources, there are several regions worldwide with geothermal and geologic conditions very similar to Hawaii, such as Iceland and New Zealand. Both nations benefit from electrical rates of up to 12 cents per kilowatt hour, compared to Hawaii’s average of 32 cents/kwh. DLNR also points out that these two countries, plus Japan and Indonesia, have seen decades of safe and economical use of geothermal energy.

• Safeguards are already in place. “The State of Hawaii has developed a thorough series of procedures to review, regulate and oversee the development of geothermal resources,” says DLNR Chair William Aila. “This includes the drilling of all geothermal wells, the protection of underground sources of drinking water, safe well construction techniques, and seismic monitoring.”

Also, geothermal development projects are required by Chapter 343, Hawaii Revised Statutes, to develop an Environmental Impact Statement, which includes public disclosure of potential impacts and proposed mitigations measures that are subject to public hearings and a public comment period before any project can proceed forward. “These processes are already in place ensure the protection of the environment, natural and cultural resources, and the public’s health and safety,” Alia says.

• Geothermal has Hawaiian support. “Hawaiians have supported and continue to support geothermal development on Hawaii Island,” says Mililani Trask of the Innovations Development Group. She points out geothermal development has received support by the largest Hawaiian organization, the Hawaiian Civic Clubs, Hawaiian energy producers and land owners, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, who has also invested in a Hawaiian company seeking to develop the resource on Hawaii Island.

We have a great opportunity to responsibly develop geothermal to provide clean, renewable and firm power to our homes and businesses at a lower cost.

Sen. Malama Solomon

Senate District 4 (Hilo, Hāmākua, Waimea, Kohala, Waikoloa and Kona)

Sam Choy’s Poke Contest Coming Up

Put your braggin’ in the bowl and enter your favorite poke recipe to win cash and prizes at the third Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest Sunday, March 16. Public tasting is 12:30 p.m. at the Convention Center at the Sheraton Kona Resort & Spa at Keauhou Bay.

Sam Choy Poke Contest 131

Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest is part of Keauhou Resort’s annual Kamehameha III celebration March 14-17 that commemorates the Keauhou-born king, Lani Kauikeaouli.

Other festivities include:

• Free Puana Ke Iki Lecture by Lily Dudoit, “Keauhou-Where the Current Continues to Renew Itself,” 5:30-7 p.m. March 14 at the Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa at Keauhou Bay.

*Lani Kauikeaouli Canoe Race, 7 a.m. March 15 at Keauhou Bay, hosted by Keauhou Canoe Club

• Free 14th annual Kamehameha III “Lani Kauikeaouli” Concert, 4:30-10 p.m. March 15 on the lawn at Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa at Keauhou Bay. Emcees Skylark Rossetti and Kimo Kahoano with Punahele, Mailani, Nina Kealliwahamana, Marlene Sai, Sonny Lim, Ladies of Na Lei O Kaholoku, Mark Yamanaka and Kapena.

• Free Daughters of Hawai‘i Tribute, 10 a.m. March 17 at Keauhou Bay with Royal Order of Kamehameha and 200 Kamehameha Schools Ipukukui students.

Sam Choy Poke Contest 158

Poke contest fun is 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and includes Hawai’i Island Marketplace, a “Poke Throw Down,” a celebrity “Poke Chop” cookoff, guest speakers, entertainment by Royal Hawaii Band Kona and others, cultural demonstrations and delicious poke tasting.

Contest competition is in five categories: traditional, cooked, poke with Aloha Shoyu soy sauce, non-seafood and a new category—poke with Hamakua Mushrooms. Suisan Company Ltd. will donate 15 pounds of fresh filet ahi to the first 50 entrants using fish. It contestant wants additional ahi, it will be offered at wholesale price. Suisan also offers seafood to contestants at a wholesale price. Contest entry deadline is March 10; find forms at www.SamChoysKeauhouPokeContest.org.

Entry fee is $15 for amateurs and $30 for professionals—culinary students can participate for free. High schoolers can enter in a new High School Division and college culinary students are welcome to again vie in the non-professional category.

Chefs from Facebook’s campus restaurants on the Mainland are bringing a contingent to again vie in the professional division. Last year’s overall contest winner was ‘Umeke’s of Kailua-Kona.

Public admission to all contest activities is $5 (limit of five poke tastes) or $10 for an event bag and unlimited tastes until gone.  Keiki under 12 are free). Proceeds benefit the $150,000 Equip the Kitchens Campaign for the future Hawai‘i Community College-Palamanui campus. Last year’s contest donated $5,000 to the effort.

Sam Choy Poke Contest 180

A free trolley will operate from Keauhou Shopping Center (pickup near Longs Drugs) 4-10:30 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday.

Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest is part of Keauhou Resort’s annual Kamehameha III celebration March 14-17 that commemorates the Keauhou-born king, Lani Kauikeaouli. The contest is sponsored by Kamehameha Schools, Aloha Shoyu Company, Suisan Company Ltd., Hawaiian Springs, Hamakua Mushrooms, West Hawaii Today, the Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa at Keauhou Bay, Fresh Island Fish, Coca Cola, BMW of Hawaii, Tanioka’s Seafood & Catering, Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai, Roberts Hawaii, Bacardi, Sun Dried Specialties, Kapa Radio and Young’s Market Co.

14th Annual ‘Ukulele Festival at Waikoloa Beach Resort

Waikoloa Beach Resort presents the 14th Annual Great Waikoloa ‘Ukulele Festival, Saturday March 1.  A free ‘ukulele workshop with Roy and Kathy Sakuma starts off the day-long celebration—which includes nonstop entertainment and a special appearance by multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winners “Kapena” with Kelly Boy DeLima.

Roy Sakuma and previous workshop members. PHOTO:  Courtesy Waikoloa Beach Resort

Roy Sakuma and previous workshop members. (Courtesy Waikoloa Beach Resort)

Hawaii’s “Ambassador of Aloha” Danny Kaleikini is Master of Ceremonies for the ‘Ukulele Festival,  spotlighting fourteen performances on two stages, with ‘ukulele lessons, demonstrations and giveaways offered throughout the afternoon.

Roy and wife Kathy Sakuma created the first annual ‘Ukulele Festival in 1971, while Roy was a maintenance worker for the City and County of Honolulu.  Today, their efforts have grown into a series of events on four islands, with over 20,000 participants.  The original ‘Ukulele Festival at Kapi‘olani Bandstand in Waikiki, hosts a performance by an 800-member ‘ukulele orchestra every July.  Their 501 (c)(3) nonprofit, ‘Ukulele Festival Hawaii, was established in 2004, “To bring laughter, love and hope to children and adults throughout Hawaii and the world through the music of the ‘ukulele.”

Appearing with Roy at the ‘Ukulele Festival will be his mentor for over 50 years, Herb “Ohta-San” Ohta, jazz guitarist Nando Suan, and his protégée Nelly Toyama-Baduria.  Sponsors include Waikoloa Beach Resort, Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa, Kings’ Shops, Queens’ MarketPlace, ‘Ukulele Festival Hawaii, Roberts Hawaii, ‘ukulele companies: KALA, Kamaka ‘Ukulele, Kanile’a ‘Ukulele, KoAloha and Ko’olau Pono Guitar & Hawaii Music Supply. For more information, call 808-886-8822 or visit www.WaikoloaBeachResort.net.

Waikoloa Beach Resort is a complete destination resort that encompasses two championship golf courses and over 3,000 guest rooms in two upscale hotels, and seven luxury condominiums and vacation home properties.  The Resort also includes award-winning Queens’ MarketPlace and Kings’ Shops, offering a wide variety of shopping opportunities, services and dining experiences, plus free entertainment and cultural programs.  For more information visit www.WaikoloaBeachResort.com or call (808) 886-8822.

‘UKULELE FESTIVAL:  SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:  Saturday, March 1, 2014

Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa, Ali`i Ballroom

10:00 a.m.-11:15 a.m.

‘Ukulele Workshop with Roy and Kathy Sakuma. BYOU (bring your own ‘ukulele). Free.

Kings’ Shops Center Stage

11:15 a.m., Kris Fuchigami

12 p.m., Kalama Intermediate ‘Ukulele Youth Ensemble

1 p.m., Hawaii Preparatory Academy

2 p.m., Roy Sakuma with Nelly Toyama-Baduria, Daniel Baduria and Nick Acosta

3 p.m., Uncle Uke

4 p.m. Ohta San and Nando Suan

Queens’ MarketPlace Coronation Pavilion

12 p.m., Waikoloa School, Hawaii Preparatory Academy, Kealakehe Intermediate School

12:45 p.m., Kahikina’s Nahenahe ‘Ohana

1:45 p.m., Kalama Intermediate ‘Ukulele Youth Ensemble

2:30 p.m., Mele ‘Ohana ‘Ukulele Group

3:30 p.m., Brad Bordessa and Anthrophony

4:30 p.m., Roy Sakuma with Nelly Toyama-Baduria, Daniel Baduria and Nick Acosta

5:30 p.m., Kapena with Kelly Boy DeLima

6:30 p.m., Ohta San and Nando Suan

Queens’ MarketPlace 1:00-5:00 p.m.

• ‘Ukulele Making Demonstration with Bob Gleason

• ‘Ukulele Lessons with Aunty Barni Fischer and Aunty Hanae Okumura

• Kala ‘Ukulele Sales

UH Hilo Students to be Featured at 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting

Thirteen students from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Marine Science Department and Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental Science (TCBES) Graduate Program will attend this year’s Ocean Science Meeting February 23-28 at the Hawaiʻi Convention Center in Honolulu.

Ocean Science Meeting

The meeting is the largest gathering of ocean scientists in the world and is expected to attract more than 5,000 people.

The students will be among presenters sharing the results of their research via posters and oral presentations. They will also showcase Hawaiʻi’s cultural heritage by performing a series of traditional Hawaiian chants, including a chant about voyaging that follows the introduction of the opening speaker, Dr. Elizabeth Kapu`uwailani Lindsey, who will be recognized and honored for her role as a way-finder.

The trip is sponsored by various scientific endeavors. Seven students have received travel grants from the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) Multicultural Program. The other six are supported with funds from the Hawaiʻi EPSCoR grant.

Board of Education Sets Firm Support of Hawaiian Education

Today the Hawaii State Board of Education (BOE) and the Department of Education (DOE) reaffirmed its commitment to Hawaiian Education and Hawaiian Immersion programs in Hawaii’s public schools.

DOE ReleaseThe Hawaiian Education policy states “Hawaii’s public education system should embody Hawaiian values, language, culture and history as a foundation to prepare student in grades K-12 for success in college, career and communities, locally and globally.” Board policy 2104 affirms that Hawaiian language, culture, and history should be an integral part of Hawaii’s educational standards for all students in grades K-12.

BOE Chairperson Don Horner stated, “The policy strengthens our commitment to offer students the added value of a bilingual, bicultural based education. The curricula will have rigorous performance standards and be taught by a core of qualified, effective teachers. The goal is to graduate outstanding students that are highly proficient in both English and Hawaiian and are well prepared for college, career and contributors to community.”

The Board spent nearly one year working with stakeholders to craft the policy revisions. BOE Student Achievement Committee Chairperson, Cheryl Kauhane Lupenui explained that, “It was very important that stakeholders be an integral part of this process and the policies reflect the shared goals of the DOE and the community. We held more than 40 stakeholder meetings during the development process and at today’s meeting we received over 100 testimony in support of the policies.”

Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi stated, “The department looks forward to advancing Hawaiian education as an integral part of our public schools for all students.”

The state currently has 20 Hawaiian Immersion programs which includes six charter schools. The proposed amendments to BOE policy 2104 and 2105 are linked on our General Business Meeting agenda here on the BOE site.

The Opening Hula at Today’s Kamehameha School’s Ho’olaule’a

Here is one of my son’s hula performances he performed today at the Kamehameha Schools Ho’olaule’a:

He’s in the back row if you can’t figure it out.

Hawaii Drivers License Exams Now Available in Variety of Languages Including Hawaiian

The state Department of Transportation (DOT), the City & County of Honolulu, along with Maui, Hawaii and Kauai Counties announce that beginning Monday, March 17, 2014, the state driver license exam will be available in a variety of languages.

Hawaii Drivers License Sample

In addition to English, twelve languages are being offered to better serve our diverse communities. The languages include the following: Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Tongan, Samoan, Tagalog, Ilocano, Hawaiian, Spanish, Chuukese and Marshallese.

Driver license exams are offered at the following locations:

City and County of Honolulu
• Kalihi-Kapalama – 1199 Dillingham Blvd., Driver Licensing A-101, (808) 532-7730
• Wahiawa – 330 North Cane St., (808) 621-7255
• Waianae – 85-670 Farrington Hwy., (808) 768-4222
• Kapolei – 1000 Ulu`ohi`a St., (808) 768-3100
• Koolau – 47-388 Hui Iwa St., Suite 19, (808) 239-6301

Maui County
• Kahului – 70 E. Kaahumanu Ave., Suite A-17 (Maui Mall Shopping Center), (808) 270-7363
• Kihei – 303 East Lipoa St., (808) 270-7363
• Lahaina – 900 Front St., Unit I-17, (808) 270-7363
• Pukalani – 91 Pukalani St. (Hannibal Tavares Community Center), (808) 270-7363
• Hana – Hana Hwy. and Uakea Rd. (County Public Works Office), (808) 248-7280
• Lanai – 309 Seventh St. #101, (808) 565-7878
• Molokai – 100 Ailoa St. (Mitchell Pauole Center), (808) 553-3430

Hawaii County
• Hilo – 349 Kapiolani St., (808) 961-2222
• Kona – 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. (West Hawaii Civic Center), (808) 323-4800
• Waimea – 67-5185 Kamammalu St. (808) 887-3087
• Pahoa – 15-2615 Keaau-Pahoa Rd., (808) 965-2721

Kauai County
• Lihue – 4444 Rice St.,Suite A-480, (808) 241-4242

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park “After Dark in the Park” Events for March

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in March. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Lava flows erupted from the Northeeast Rift Zone of Mauna Loa on March 25, 1984. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory photo

Lava flows erupted from the Northeeast Rift Zone of Mauna Loa on March 25, 1984. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory photo

From Ka‘ū to Kona: Stories of Lava Flows and Volcanic Landscapes. While driving between Ka‘ū and Kona, have you ever wondered about the prominent lava flows you see along Queen Ka‘ahumanu and Māmalahoa Highways?  If so, you are invited to join USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists Jim Kauahikaua and Janet Babb on a virtual road trip, during which they will talk about the origin and history of lava flows along Highways 11 and 190, and recount the stories of people impacted by the eruptions that created the volcanic landscape we see today. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., March 4 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

‘Ohe Kapala Demonstration. ‘Ohe kapala, or bamboo stamps, were utilized to present many unique designs for traditional Hawaiian kapa.  Today, these exceptional designs are being used as patterns on all types of fabric. Join Keiko Mercado as she demonstrates how ‘ohe (bamboo) are carved into beautiful designs and how they are used. There will be samples and a hands-on opportunity to learn about this distinctive art form. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., March 12 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Ben Ka‘ili in Concert.
Hawaiian musician Ben Ka‘ili has dedicated his life to playing and promoting Hawaiian music. He has shared Hawaiian music at festivals, including the park’s 33rd annual cultural festival last July, and through concerts and performances for more than 20 years. Born on the Island of Hawai‘i, Ka‘ili started playing Hawaiian music at eight years old with his ‘ohana, including his uncle, George Lanakilakeikiahiali‘i Na‘ope. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., March 19 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Mauna Loa: Eruptive History and Current Status of Earth’s Largest Active Volcano. March 25, 2014, marks the 30th anniversary of the most recent eruption of Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano on Earth. Mauna Loa comprises more than half of the surface area of Hawai‘i Island, and 95 percent of this volcano is covered with lava flows less than 10,000 years old.  Since 1843, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times – and when it erupts, fast-moving and voluminous lava flows can reach the ocean in a matter of hours, severing roads and utilities, repaving the flanks of the volcano, and building new land.  Join USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Frank Trusdell as he talks about the eruptive history and current status of Mauna Loa, an active volcano that will undoubtedly erupt again—perhaps in your lifetime.  Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., March 25 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Uhana Lauhala. Learn to weave a star from leaves of the pandanus tree. Join members of ‘Aha Pūhala o Puna as they share the art of lauhala weaving to perpetuate this Hawaiian art. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., March 26 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Office of Hawaiian Affairs Awards $1.5 Million for Charter Schools

The Board of Trustees of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) approved $1.5 million in emergency funding to seventeen Hawaiian-focused public charter schools for the 2013-2014 school year to address the budgetary shortfalls the schools have continued to face over the past five years.

The Nā Lei Na‘auao – Native Hawaiian Charter School Alliance (NLN) is truly grateful for OHA’s continued commitment to support these unique values-based models of education, that are at once ancient and modern. The schools’ successes validate NLN’s capacity to design and control the process of education dedicated to perpetuating Hawai‘i’s language, culture and traditions. The process helps the native learning communities honor the past, address the present and serve the future.

Haunani Seward, the Director of Ke Kula Ni’ihau ‘o Kekaha on Kaua’i explains, “Our culture is defined by our values.  When we learn our genealogy, we honor our ancestors.  When we recognize a place as piko, we aloha ʻāina.  Accepting and recognizing our leadership roles is kuleana and we mālama these relationships.  These beliefs are the kaula or rope that binds us together.  NLN captures this kaula, creating relevant curricula for today’s haumāna.  Whether through language, reforestation, hula drama, or sailing canoes, the outcome is ultimately the same – passing on these important cultural values.”

An innovative, culturally-driven educational approach, known as EA-Education with Aloha presents unprecedented potential to address the distinctive needs of Hawai’i’s largest, most undereducated major ethnic population.  The success of EA-Education with Aloha is also an indicator that Hawaiians can design, implement and evaluate quality models of education and that public school children in Hawai’i, particularly native Hawaiian students, should be given an option to choose Hawaiian-focused ways of education.  Furthermore through public, private partnerships and sharing of resources, we can develop a parallel system of education that is culturally-driven, family-oriented and community-based for all Hawai’i nei.

Research have confirmed that Hawaiians in charter schools perform better on standardized reading and math tests and are significantly less chronically absent than Hawaiians in standard public schools. NLN schools have high levels of school engagement and positive achievements due to culturally-grounded, strength-based approaches, which are sensitive to student and family needs.

Co-Administrator Allyson Tamura of Kanu o ka ‘Äina New Century Public Charter School (KANU), located in Waimea on the island of Hawai’i, is extremely appreciative for OHA’s continued support of Hawaiian-focused public charter schools.  “OHA’s support allows KANU to remain steadfast to our school’s vision and mission, positively impacting our students, staff, their families and our community.  Mahalo nui loa!”

OHA’s generous funding will support over 4,000 students at seventeen Hawaiian-focused public charter schools with enrollments that are up to 90-percent Hawaiian. These schools are located on the islands of Kauai, O‘ahu, Moloka‘i and Hawai’i Island.

OHA is a unique, independent state agency established through the Hawai‘i State Constitution and statutes to advocate for the betterment of conditions of all Native Hawaiians with a Board of Trustees elected by the voters of Hawai‘i. OHA is guided by a vision and mission to ensure the perpetuation of the culture, to protect the entitlements of Native Hawaiians, and to build a strong and healthy Hawaiian people and nation.

Kamehameha Schools to Purchase Buildings and Land Comprising the Hualalai Academy’s Campus – Kamehameha Schools Kona Campus???

Leaders from Kamehameha Schools and Hualalai Academy have signed a Letter of Intent that allows for a due diligence period for Kamehameha Schools to purchase the buildings and land comprising the Hualalai Academy’s campus.

Hualalai Academy

Hualalai Academy

“We only recently learned that this property was available to purchase so we are not prepared at this time to share more details,” said Dee Jay Mailer, CEO of Kamehameha Schools. “I can say, though, that we recognize and appreciate the good work and effort that the leadership, faculty and staff have dedicated to the Academy over the years in serving their community.”

Dr. Matthew James, President of Hualalai’s Board of Directors said, “We have as our priority the closure of our school in the best of ways, allowing us to meet our obligations to our students and families, our teachers and staff through the end of the school year. Having an offer from Kamehameha Schools is good news in that it allows us to cement our plans to successfully complete our school year and close school operations prior to turning over the facility.”

“We are excited by this opportunity,” CEO Mailer added. “However, our due diligence is just beginning and there is much to do before we conclude this transaction. In the meantime, we send our aloha and best wishes to the entire Hualalai Academy ‘ohana and the community they serve as they complete this most important school year.”

Tomorrow! Kamehameha Schools Hawai’i Ho’olaule’a

Ho'olaulea 2014

Mahalo to the following companies for donating to the silent auction various gift certificates:

  • Black Rock Cafe
  • Blue Hawaiian Helicopters
  • Dahana Ranch Horseback Ride
  • Fun Factory
  • Divas Boutique
  • Hana Hou Photography
  • Hawaiian Airlines
  • Hawaiian Style Cafe
  • HBW Banners & Wraps
  • Hilo Bay Cafe
  • Hilo Hawaiian Hotel
  • Hilo Rice Noodle
  • Hualalai Resort Spa Massage
  • Imiloa
  • Kaleo’s Bar & Grill
  • KTA
  • HELCO credit
  • Kuhio Grille
  • BI Toyota Detail
  • Lyman Museum
  • Macy’s
  • Maui Divers Jewelry
  • Miyo’s
  • Nagareda Chiropractic
  • Natural Beauty Spa & Massage
  • Pizza Hawaii & Deli
  • Roy’s Waikoloa
  • Thirty-One Bag
  • Waipio Ride The Rim
  • Longs Drugs

The following items will also be available to bid on:

  • Big Island Delights
  • Big Island Candies
  • Handmade Ceramic Trivets
  • Hand Crafted Jewelry
  • Ceramics
  • Jade Bracelets
  • Dooney & Burke Drawstring Purse
  • Lots of various artwork
  • Poi Board
  • Poi Pounder
  • Lauhala Hat
  • Lots of KOA & hand crafted wood items!
  • Manuheali’i totes
  • Sig Zane Hat & shirts
  • Scenty Gift Basket
  • Pipipi Shell Leis
  • Handmade quilt piece
  • Handcrafted Hawaiian shirts
  • Konane Board
  • Ka’u Coffee
  • Hawaiian Rainforest Gift Pack
  • Wooden Walking Sticks

And more!!! Come check it out in the dining hall stage area.

DLNR and NOAA Fisheries Ask Public’s Help to Protect Hawaiian Spinner Dolphins

The Hawai‘i Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) and NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) are advising people to be “dolphin smart.”To avoid potential harassment of spinner dolphins, ocean and beach goers should keep the recommended distance of 150 feet (50 yards) when observing dolphins in the wild. Hawaiian spinner dolphins move near shore into bays and coves during the day to rest, care for their young, and avoid predators. During this time it is important not to disturb them as these activities are critical to their survival. At night they move offshore to feed.

Dolphin Smart

“It is tempting to approach and interact with these animals; however, research has shown that these interactions can interfere with their natural behavior and could have population-wide effects,”said William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR chairperson.

NOAA Fisheries Regional Administrator Michael Tosatto added: “Close interactions with the dolphins are not only potentially harmful to them, but can lead to harassment, which is illegal. By following the responsible viewing guidelines, we can limit the impacts our activities may have on the animals.”

Spinner dolphins are named for their unique behavior of leaping out of the water and spinning in the air. These social animals travel in groups of 10, 100 or more and are believed to live over 20 years.

They are protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), which prohibits the “take”of marine mammals. “Take”means to harass, hunt, capture, or kill, or attempt to harass, hunt, capture, or kill any marine mammal.

DLNR and NOAA Fisheries encourage all ocean users to follow Dolphin SMART guidelines, which are:

  • Stay at least 50 yards from dolphins
  • Move away cautiously if dolphins show signs of disturbance
  • Always put your engine in neutral when dolphins are near
  • Refrain from feeding, touching, or swimming with wild dolphins
  • Teach others to be Dolphin SMART

The Dolphin SMART program recognizes commercial tour operators that voluntarily adhere to responsible guidelines. For more information and a list of approved businesses, visit www.dolphinsmart.org.

Report any violations of the MMPA to NOAA Fisheries’Enforcement Hotline at 1-800-853-1964.

Kupuna Talk-Story Night Offered

The County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation cordially invites the public to a “Kupuna Talk-Story Night: Perpetuating the Art of Storytelling” event at 5:30 p.m. Friday, February 28, at Waiākea-Uka Park in Hilo.

countylogo

Noted kupuna will share their first-hand stories of old Hawai‘i. Admission is free. Families and individuals of all ages are welcome.

Waiākea-Uka Park is located at 1200 Ainaola Drive and includes Stanley Costales Gymnasium. The talk-story session will be held on the gym’s lanai.

For more details, please call Mark Osorio at 959-9474.