Crew for Second HI-SEAS Mission Announced – Next Extended Simulation of Mars Exploration Begins March 28

The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa has announced the crew for the second mission of the Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) program. The next extended simulation of Mars exploration here on Earth begins March 28.

HI-Seas photo by Angelo Vermeulen

HI-Seas photo by Angelo Vermeulen

“The upcoming mission is focused on the social, interpersonal, and cognitive factors that affect team performance over time,” said Kim Binsted, associate professor at UH Mānoa and principal investigator for the next three HI-SEAS missions planned for 2014 and 2015.  “Hawai‘i provides a unique setting to simulate the challenging conditions for human exploration to Mars. We have selected a strong crew for our next four-month study.”

The site is set up at an undisclosed location on Mauna Kea.

The site is set up at an undisclosed location on Mauna Kea.

HI-SEAS crew members were required have “astronaut-like characteristics,” including the ability to pass a Class 2 flight physical examination and undergraduate training as a scientist or engineer. The youngest crew member is 26; the oldest is 60 years old.  Like the astronaut mission specialists they represent, each participant is expected to bring a significant research project or other scholarly work of his or her own to complete while inside the space analog habitat.

The six crew members and the reserve (alternate) member are:

  • Ross Lockwood – A PhD candidate in condensed matter physics at the University of Alberta. Ross is from Winfield, British Columbia, Canada.
  • Casey Stedman – An officer in the US Air Force Reserve. Born in Vermont, Casey now considers Washington his home.
  • Ronald Williams – Director of the Neuropsychology Department at Fort Wayne Neurological Center, Indiana. Ron holds a PhD in Neuropsychology and is from Bloomington, Indiana.
  • Tiffany Swarmer – Research assistant studying human factors and performance for long-duration space missions at the University of North Dakota’s Human Spaceflight Laboratory.  Tiffany was born at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland.
  • Lucie Poulet – A PhD candidate at the Institute of Space Systems at the German Aerospace Center.  Lucie designs hybrid lighting systems for greenhouses to enhance plant growth and is from the Lorraine region of France.
  • Anne Caraccio – A NASA researcher developing a method of turning waste from space missions into useable gases for fuel/propulsion, environmental control, and life support systems. Anne is from Bellmore, New York.
  • (Reserve crew member) James Sakai, a mechanical engineer and Captain in the US Army Reserve, is from Rupert, Idaho.

During the upcoming study, researchers from outside of the HI-SEAS habitat will monitor the six crew members isolated inside the solar-powered dome at a remote site at 8,000 feet elevation on the slopes of Mauna Loa.  The researchers will evaluate the crew’s communications strategies, crew workload and job-sharing, and conflict resolution/conflict management approaches to determine the most important factors for the success of a long-duration space mission.

Food inventory by Sian

Food inventory by Sian

This mission follows on the heels of a successful 2013 Mars food study, which simulated the experience of astronauts on a real planetary mission and compared two types of food systems:  crew-cooked vs. pre-prepared.

More information, photos, and full biographies for the 2014 crew members are available on the HI-SEAS website at http://hi-seas.org/.  Members of the media can download high-resolution photos from the previous HI-SEAS mission at:  http://go.hawaii.edu/GQ

For more information, visit: http://hi-seas.org/

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New Mushroom Category at Sam Choy’s Poke Contest

Fun is mushrooming at the third Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest Sunday, March 16 at the Sheraton Kona Resort Convention Center.

A new competition category—poke with Hamakua Mushrooms—encourages the use of mushrooms from the Big Isle’s gourmet fungal company located in rural Laupahoehoe. It joins four other culinary categories: traditional, cooked, poke with Aloha Shoyu soy sauce and non-seafood.

Hamakua Mushrooms

Hamakua Mushrooms

“The poke contest is all about sharing our favorite recipes and using local products,” says celebrity chef Sam Choy. ”Put your braggin’ in the bowl and enter to win prizes.”

Hamakua Mushrooms (HM) produces over 5,000 pounds of specialty and exotic mushrooms weekly. The exacting, multi-step growing process, which is done in a series of environmentally controlled rooms, will be detailed at the festival during a video. Attendees will also be able to see the bouquets of fresh, flavorful mushrooms growing in their sterilized bottles—Hamakua Mushrooms produces four varieties of shrooms.

“Contestants can source our mushrooms at islandwide grocers,” details HM co-owner Janice Stanga. “Our ali‘i oyster and pioppini mushrooms are sold at Costco, KTA, Safeway, Foodland and Sack ‘n Save.” For more info, phone HM at 808-962-0017.

Entry fee is $15 for amateurs and $30 for professionals—culinary students can participate for free. High schoolers can enter in a new High School Division and college culinary students are welcome to again vie in the non-professional category.

Suisan Company Ltd. will donate 15 pounds of fresh filet ahi to the first 50 entrants using fish. It contestant wants additional ahi, it will be offered at wholesale price. Suisan also offers seafood to contestants at a wholesale price. Contest entry deadline is March 10; find forms at www.SamChoysKeauhouPokeContest.org.

Poke contest fun is 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and includes Hawai’i Island Marketplace, a “Poke Throw Down,” a celebrity “Poke Chop” cookoff, guest speakers, entertainment by Royal Hawaii Band Kona and cultural demonstrations. Public poke tasting is 12:30 p.m.

Poke Cook-off

Public admission to all contest activities is $5 (limit of five poke tastes) or $10 for an event bag and unlimited tastes until gone.  Keiki under 12 are free). Proceeds benefit the $150,000 Equip the Kitchens Campaign for the future Hawai‘i Community College-Palamanui campus. Last year’s contest donated $5,000 to the effort.

A free trolley will operate from Keauhou Shopping Center (pickup near Longs Drugs) 4-10:30 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday.

Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest is part of Keauhou Resort’s annual Kamehameha III celebration March 14-17 that commemorates the Keauhou-born king, Lani Kauikeaouli. The contest is sponsored by Kamehameha Schools, Aloha Shoyu Company, Suisan Company Ltd., Hawaiian Springs, Hamakua Mushrooms, West Hawaii Today, the Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa at Keauhou Bay, Fresh Island Fish, Coca Cola, BMW of Hawaii, Tanioka’s Seafood & Catering, Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai, Roberts Hawaii, Bacardi, Sun Dried Specialties, Kapa Radio and Young’s Market Co.

Big Island Police Looking for Suspects Involved in Coffee Parchment Theft

Hawaiʻi Island police are asking for the public’s help in identifying suspects involved in a theft in Nāʻālehu.

HPDBadge
On February 11, at about 4:06 p.m., police received a call from a 53-year-old homeowner reporting that unknown suspects had removed 10 80-pound brown burlap bags of coffee parchment, a 10-foot by 10-foot instant gazebo and an electric garage door opener from his property. The bags are marked with “14-2” in black ink. The value of the stolen items is $10,000.

Kaʻū patrol officers are continuing the investigation, which is classified as a second-degree theft.

Police ask anyone with information on this incident or anyone who may know the identities of the suspects to call Officer Augustine Akiu at 939-2520.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Canadian Bobsledders to Come to Big Island of Hawaii to Hunt Pigs

According to this article, a couple members of the Canadian Bobsled, Justin Kripps and Jesse Lumsden, will be coming to the Big Island of Hawaii after their disappointing showing in the SOCHI Olympics:

Canada's pilot Justin Kripps, Jesse Lumsden, Cody Sorensen and Ben Coakwell are assisted as their sled flips during the four-man bobsleigh event at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, at the Sanki Sliding Center in Rosa Khutor February 22, 2014. (REUTERS)

Canada’s pilot Justin Kripps, Jesse Lumsden, Cody Sorensen and Ben Coakwell are assisted as their sled flips during the four-man bobsleigh event at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, at the Sanki Sliding Center in Rosa Khutor February 22, 2014. (REUTERS)

The hunt for a bobsled medal for Canada has ended, and now a different kind of hunt begins.

“Me and Jesse (Lumsden) are going to go boar-hunting in Hawaii,” said Canada 3 pilot Justin Kripps, who was born in Na’alehu, Hawaii. “They have a real boar problem there and we are going to take care of it.”

Might as well take care of the boar problem in Hawaii…

Sam Choy’s Poke Contest Coming Up

Put your braggin’ in the bowl and enter your favorite poke recipe to win cash and prizes at the third Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest Sunday, March 16. Public tasting is 12:30 p.m. at the Convention Center at the Sheraton Kona Resort & Spa at Keauhou Bay.

Sam Choy Poke Contest 131

Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest is part of Keauhou Resort’s annual Kamehameha III celebration March 14-17 that commemorates the Keauhou-born king, Lani Kauikeaouli.

Other festivities include:

• Free Puana Ke Iki Lecture by Lily Dudoit, “Keauhou-Where the Current Continues to Renew Itself,” 5:30-7 p.m. March 14 at the Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa at Keauhou Bay.

*Lani Kauikeaouli Canoe Race, 7 a.m. March 15 at Keauhou Bay, hosted by Keauhou Canoe Club

• Free 14th annual Kamehameha III “Lani Kauikeaouli” Concert, 4:30-10 p.m. March 15 on the lawn at Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa at Keauhou Bay. Emcees Skylark Rossetti and Kimo Kahoano with Punahele, Mailani, Nina Kealliwahamana, Marlene Sai, Sonny Lim, Ladies of Na Lei O Kaholoku, Mark Yamanaka and Kapena.

• Free Daughters of Hawai‘i Tribute, 10 a.m. March 17 at Keauhou Bay with Royal Order of Kamehameha and 200 Kamehameha Schools Ipukukui students.

Sam Choy Poke Contest 158

Poke contest fun is 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and includes Hawai’i Island Marketplace, a “Poke Throw Down,” a celebrity “Poke Chop” cookoff, guest speakers, entertainment by Royal Hawaii Band Kona and others, cultural demonstrations and delicious poke tasting.

Contest competition is in five categories: traditional, cooked, poke with Aloha Shoyu soy sauce, non-seafood and a new category—poke with Hamakua Mushrooms. Suisan Company Ltd. will donate 15 pounds of fresh filet ahi to the first 50 entrants using fish. It contestant wants additional ahi, it will be offered at wholesale price. Suisan also offers seafood to contestants at a wholesale price. Contest entry deadline is March 10; find forms at www.SamChoysKeauhouPokeContest.org.

Entry fee is $15 for amateurs and $30 for professionals—culinary students can participate for free. High schoolers can enter in a new High School Division and college culinary students are welcome to again vie in the non-professional category.

Chefs from Facebook’s campus restaurants on the Mainland are bringing a contingent to again vie in the professional division. Last year’s overall contest winner was ‘Umeke’s of Kailua-Kona.

Public admission to all contest activities is $5 (limit of five poke tastes) or $10 for an event bag and unlimited tastes until gone.  Keiki under 12 are free). Proceeds benefit the $150,000 Equip the Kitchens Campaign for the future Hawai‘i Community College-Palamanui campus. Last year’s contest donated $5,000 to the effort.

Sam Choy Poke Contest 180

A free trolley will operate from Keauhou Shopping Center (pickup near Longs Drugs) 4-10:30 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday.

Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest is part of Keauhou Resort’s annual Kamehameha III celebration March 14-17 that commemorates the Keauhou-born king, Lani Kauikeaouli. The contest is sponsored by Kamehameha Schools, Aloha Shoyu Company, Suisan Company Ltd., Hawaiian Springs, Hamakua Mushrooms, West Hawaii Today, the Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa at Keauhou Bay, Fresh Island Fish, Coca Cola, BMW of Hawaii, Tanioka’s Seafood & Catering, Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai, Roberts Hawaii, Bacardi, Sun Dried Specialties, Kapa Radio and Young’s Market Co.

Wordless Wednesday: For Lease – County of Hawaii Office of the Mayor/Executive Branch

I received the following picture from a friend and I think it speaks for itself:

For Lease

Picture taken earlier today by Tanya Yamanaka Aynessazian

Ka’u Coffee Festival Schedule and Information

The Ka‘u Coffee Festival celebrates its award-winning brew with a host of events that kickoff May 2 and culminate the weekend of May 10-11 with a ho‘olaule‘a on Saturday and coffee “college” on Sunday. Serving as an economic stimulus for the rural Ka‘u region, the festival is supported by the County of Hawai‘i Department of Research & Development, Hawai‘i Tourism Authority and Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture.

Kau Coffee FestivalOn Friday, May 2, 5:30 p.m. – 9 p.m. Pa‘ina Open House at historic Pahala Plantation House with Ka‘u Chamber of Commerce to kick off 10 days of activities for the 2014 Ka‘u Coffee Festival. Music, hula with Halau Hula O Leionalani, food and house tours. Donations accepted for Miss Ka‘u Coffee Scholarship Fund. Corner of Maile and Pikake in Pahala. Hosted by Pahala Plantation Cottages, Ka‘u Chamber of Commerce and The Ka‘u Calendar newspaper. www.kaucoffeefest.comwww.pahalaplantationcottages.com. 808-928-9811.

On Saturday, May 3 Taste Success: 4th Annual Ka‘u  Farmers’ Table at Kalaekilohana Inn and Retreat features locally sourced fine dining, premium live entertainment, and has been sold out three years running. Advance only tickets are $75 at www.kau-hawaii.com.

On Sunday, May 4 the Triple C Recipe offers competition in cookies, candies and crackers at 12:00 noon, all made with provided Ka‘u coffee. Attendance and coffee tasting are free; find contest entry info at kaucoffeemill.com.

Also on Sunday, May 4 doors open 6 p.m. for the annual Miss Ka‘u Coffee Pageant at Ka‘u Coffee Mill. For more information visit www.KauCoffeeFest.com.

During the week visit Ka‘u coffee farms. Enjoy the scenic and historic beauty of Ka‘u, Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach, Honu‘apo fishponds, the cliffs of Ka Lae – the southernmost place in the U.S., and the nearby Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Stay in one of the many accommodations in Ka‘u. Visit www.kaucoffeefest.com for participating coffee farms and accommodations.

On Wednesday May 7 explore flume systems of the sugarcane era and development of hydroelectric power on a Ka‘u Mountain Water System in the Wood Valley rainforest 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $40 includes lunch. Limited to 30. Visit www.kaucoffeemill.com or phone 808-928-0550.

On Friday May 9 enjoy Coffee & Cattle Day at Aikane Plantation Coffee farm at 10 a.m., where descendants of the first coffee farmer in Ka‘u explain how coffee is integrated into other agriculture.  $25 fee includes an all-you can eat buffet. Visit www.aikaneplantation.com or phone 808-927-2252.

On Friday May 9 observe the heavens from the summit of Makanau at Ka‘u Star Gazing, 5:30-10 p.m. $35 with refreshments. To sign up, see www.kaucoffeemill.com or call 808-928-0550.

On Saturday, May 10 tantalize your taste buds at the Ka‘u Coffee Festival Ho‘olaule‘a, with a full day of music, hula, food, local crafts, coffee tastings and farm/mill tours at the Pahala Community Center. Festival entry is free; Ka‘u Coffee Experience with guided coffee tasting $5; farm tours $20. Call 808-929-9550 or visit www.KauCoffeeFest.com.

On Sunday, May 11 learn about the coffee industry at the Ka‘u Coffee College at Pahala Community Center. Free, donations appreciated. Also farm/ mill tours continue. Call 808-929-9550 or visit www.KauCoffeeFest.com.

Founded in coffee traditions hailing to the 1800s—plus the hard work of former sugar plantation workers—Ka‘u coffee burst onto the specialty coffee scene by winning numerous coffee quality awards. These accolades highlight the unique combination of people and place that makes Ka‘u coffee a favorite across the globe. The festival’s mission is to raise awareness of Ka‘u as a world-class, coffee-growing origin.

Ka‘u Coffee Festival vendor and sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information and festival updates, visit kaucoffeefest.com, follow Ka‘u Coffee Festival on Facebook and @kaucoffeefest on Twitter, or call 808-929-9550.

Tomorrow! Kamehameha Schools Hawai’i Ho’olaule’a

Ho'olaulea 2014

Mahalo to the following companies for donating to the silent auction various gift certificates:

  • Black Rock Cafe
  • Blue Hawaiian Helicopters
  • Dahana Ranch Horseback Ride
  • Fun Factory
  • Divas Boutique
  • Hana Hou Photography
  • Hawaiian Airlines
  • Hawaiian Style Cafe
  • HBW Banners & Wraps
  • Hilo Bay Cafe
  • Hilo Hawaiian Hotel
  • Hilo Rice Noodle
  • Hualalai Resort Spa Massage
  • Imiloa
  • Kaleo’s Bar & Grill
  • KTA
  • HELCO credit
  • Kuhio Grille
  • BI Toyota Detail
  • Lyman Museum
  • Macy’s
  • Maui Divers Jewelry
  • Miyo’s
  • Nagareda Chiropractic
  • Natural Beauty Spa & Massage
  • Pizza Hawaii & Deli
  • Roy’s Waikoloa
  • Thirty-One Bag
  • Waipio Ride The Rim
  • Longs Drugs

The following items will also be available to bid on:

  • Big Island Delights
  • Big Island Candies
  • Handmade Ceramic Trivets
  • Hand Crafted Jewelry
  • Ceramics
  • Jade Bracelets
  • Dooney & Burke Drawstring Purse
  • Lots of various artwork
  • Poi Board
  • Poi Pounder
  • Lauhala Hat
  • Lots of KOA & hand crafted wood items!
  • Manuheali’i totes
  • Sig Zane Hat & shirts
  • Scenty Gift Basket
  • Pipipi Shell Leis
  • Handmade quilt piece
  • Handcrafted Hawaiian shirts
  • Konane Board
  • Ka’u Coffee
  • Hawaiian Rainforest Gift Pack
  • Wooden Walking Sticks

And more!!! Come check it out in the dining hall stage area.

Call for Entries: Kona Coffee Cultural Festival Seeks 2014 Poster Image

The iconic 44th annual Kona Coffee Cultural Festival announces the launch of its annual Festival Art Contest, one that illustrates the talents of Kona’s prolific art community.

Kona Coffee Cultural Festival

Local artists are invited to submit original Kona coffee art for consideration and the winning entry will be showcased throughout the Festival. Artwork should be evocative of Kona’s coffee heritage and integrate the Festival’s 2014 theme – Bringing Kona Together.
The winning design will become the official image of the 2014 Kona Coffee Cultural Festival and will be featured on all official Festival merchandise including the Festival button, event poster and retail merchandise. The winning design will also be featured on the Festival’s magazine cover, website and other promotional materials.

Artists of traditional media including oil, acrylic, tempera, watercolor, illustrations as well as computer graphics and photographers are invited to participate. Artists are encouraged to be inspired by this year’s theme – Bringing Kona Together. Typography should not be included within the art. There is no entry fee to participate and the competition is open to all Hawaii Island residents 18 and older.

Ownership of entry copyright: By submitting artwork into this contest, the artist agrees to assign all ownership rights and copyright of the art to the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival.

Artwork submissions are due by Tuesday, April 1, 2014 and should be delivered to Malia Bolton at the Kona Coffee & Tea Company located across from Honokohau Harbor on Queen Kaahumanu Hwy or entries can be submitted electronically via email to maliabolton@gmail.com. Be sure to include “Festival Submission” in the subject line with your electronic entries.

Culinary Arts Under the Stars – Benefit for Chef & Child Foundation

Kings’ Shops is partnering once again with the American Culinary Federation (ACF) Kona Kohala Chefs Association with the return of the Culinary Arts Under the Stars event February 22, 2014.   Last year’s event sold out and this year, 100 more tickets will be available for purchase.  Tickets are going fast! Just $45 in advance or $55 at the door and can be purchased at Maui Divers Jewelry in Kings’ Shops or at www.KingsShops.com.  Kenny C will be performing at Center Court Stage next to the wine and beer garden.  Scrip for beer and wine will be on sale for $5 during the event.  Coffee and water will be available for purchase at Kings’ Coffee.

Chef Ippy Aiona at the 2012 Mealani Taste of the Hawaiian Range

Chef Ippy Aiona of the Three Fat Pigs at the 2012 Mealani Taste of the Hawaiian Range

It will be an exciting evening of food tasting throughout the center presented by the top chefs from restaurants of the Kohala Coast.  Participating restaurants include Merriman’s Mediterranean Café, Roy’s Waikoloa Bar & Grill, The Three Fat Pigs, Hawaii Calls of  Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa, Kamuela Provision Company of Hilton Waikoloa Village, Romano’s Macaroni Grill, Sansei Seafood Restaurant and Sushi Bar, Lava Lava Beach Club and Mamane Street Bakery. Students from the Hawaii Community College-West Hawaii will create exceptional desserts and salads for two tasting stations.

“One hundred percent of the proceeds will go to the ACF Chef & Child Foundation program which will benefit children right here on Hawaii Island,” said Steve Schwartz, General Manager of Kings’ Shops.  A silent auction with donations from many of the Kings’ Shops retailers and restaurants will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.  Schwartz continued, “Maui Divers Jewelry has donated a 14k gold Hawaiian Wave Pendant and an 18 inch 14k necklace, valued at $995.  This is just one example of the generosity shown by our tenants, which is truly admirable.”  Items for bid will be placed online to view prior to the event, visit www.KingsShops.com.

Join Kings’ Shops and the ACF Kona Kohala Chef Association on Saturday, February 22nd at 5 p.m. for an evening of fun and good food for a terrific cause, Hawai`i Island’s keiki. Tickets are on sale now.  For more information visit www.KingsShops.com

ABOUT THE CHEF AND CHILD FEDERATION:

The CCF mission statement is “To educate children and families in understanding proper nutrition through community based initiatives led by the American Culinary Federation chef members, and to be the voice of the culinary industry in its fight against childhood hunger, malnutrition and obesity.”  The Chef and Child Foundation have been developing programs to stimulate grass root efforts to be led by chefs in communities across America.

Natural Farming Learning Lab Grows Healthy Community in Kohala

On Saturday, March 1, 2014 from 9 am – 2 pm, the Palili ‘O Kohala project welcomes the Hawai‘i Island community to attend the blessing of the Natural Farming Learning Lab in Hawi, North Kohala. The program will include Hawaiian music, local food, workshops, demonstrations and a blessing of the Natural Farming Learning Lab, including the new Natural Farming Pig and Chicken House. The cost is $15 per person (children under 10 are free) and includes a Kohala grown lunch.

Chris Trump of Cho Global Natutal Farming Co-op will be one of the presenters on March 1st in North Kohala.

Chris Trump of Cho Global Natutal Farming Co-op will be one of the presenters on March 1st in North Kohala.

Afternoon workshops include: Introduction to Natural Farming with Chris Trump, from Cho Global Natural Farming Co-op; Raising pigs using Natural Farming with Mike DuPonte from the UH College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources; Taro Cultivation with Bert Kanoa and his students from Palili ‘O Kohala and Ka Hana No‘eau; Making Natural Farming inputs with Palili ‘O Kohala families and Ka Hana No‘eau students.

Hawaiian Ki Hō‘alu slack key guitar master Cyril Pahinui will be headlining the musical slate as well as teaching a mini-workshop in playing ukulele.

There will be ongoing talks and demonstrations on: poi pounding; raising chickens the Natural Farming way; Natural Farming, Hawaiian Saddle Making and more with the mentors and students of Ka Hana No‘eau; ukulele making with Guy Sasaki and his students from the Ka Hana No‘eau ukulele making class, and; learning about ‘uala (sweet potato) and the Kohala dryland field system with Ulu Mau Puanui.

 

Ten families in North Kohala are working together to grow taro, pigs and chickens using Natural Farming.

Ten families in North Kohala are working together to grow taro, pigs and chickens using Natural Farming.

The Natural Farming Learning Lab and Palili ‘O Kohala is a project of Kohala-based non-profit Kahua Pa‘a Mua, Inc. The Palili ‘O Kohala project is a ten family taro growing cooperative that addresses food self-sufficiency, food security and economic development in North Kohala. The project provides training, as well as resources for the growing, processing and distribution of taro and value added products from taro, pigs, chickens and vegetables. The Natural Farming Learning Lab has been created to demonstrate the efficacy of and teach others about Natural Farming methods of growing taro, pigs, chickens and vegetables. Natural Farming is a methodology that uses “indigenous microorganisms” to increase yields, eliminate the use of chemicals and reduce needs for water in crop management and animal husbandry.

The North Kohala community, in its County mandated Community Development Plan (CDP) is committed to 50% community food self-sufficiency by 2018. The Natural Farming Learning Lab and Palili ‘O Kohala are part of the community effort to reach that goal by cultivating traditional crops and using Natural Farming to grow chemical free food.

The Palili ‘O Kohala project has been generously supported by County of Hawai‘i County Council, County of Hawai‘i Department of Research and Development, Local Initiatives Fund of RSF Social Finance, Honsador Lumber, Dorrance Family Foundation, Hawai‘i Community Foundation Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund and Partners in Development Foundation. Community partners include Partners in Development Foundation Ka Hana No‘eau and North Kohala Eat Locally Grown.

Tickets are limited and advance purchase is required. Tickets can be bought online at foodhubkohala.org, in person at the EBT Booth at the Hawi Farmers Market or by phone at 808-224-1404. For information please visit foodhubkohala.org.

10th Annual Grow Hawaiian Festival at Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden

Hawai‘i Forest and Trail Presents A Grow Hawaiian Weekend

The 10th Annual Grow Hawaiian Weekend on Friday and Saturday,  February 21 and 22, is a celebration of Hawaiian cultural and natural history at Amy Greenwell Garden in Captain Cook.  Admission to the Garden will be free on those two days, and all of the activities are free.

Kai'uhane Morton

Ka’uhane Morton demonstrates how to make nose flutes

On Friday, February 21, between 1 p.m. and 4 pm., the public is invited to the Garden Visitor Center to join Greenwell Garden staff, taro experts Jerry Konanui and Keahi Tomas, and local school children in ku‘i kalo—poi pounding.  Boards and stones and cooked taro will be available for everyone from beginners to experts to try their hand at this traditional culinary art.  Also on Friday at 1 p.m., the Guided Hawaiian Plant Walk is a docent led tour of the Garden landscape of the plants of Hawai‘i in the 1600s.

The Grow Hawaiian festival takes place at the Garden on Saturday, February 22 from 9:00-2:30 pm.  Speakers will make presentations on taro cultivation, conservation, horticulture, and lauhala weaving, and artisans will demonstrate ipu gourd decorating, kapa making, weaving, woodworking, lei making, taro cultivation, and Hawaiian dyes.  There will be hands-on activities for the keiki and adults, plant and insect identification booths, displays, live entertainment, Hawaiian food, and much more!

Visitors can learn about the movement to provision Hawaiian voyaging canoes by using food grown in Hawai‘i so that the crews of the long distant canoes can eat healthy, sustainable, traditional foods as they travel across the Pacific and around the world.  There will also be a presentation on olonā cordage.  The bark of olonā has strong, durable fiber that was made into fishing line, nets, and other items for traditional life.

Some of the foremost experts in native plants and Hawaiian ethnobotany will lead tours of the Garden, and authors will be on hand to sign their books.  A silent auction will be held where visitors will have a chance to bid on poi boards, poi stones, and other traditional objects.

For more information call 323-3318, visit www.bishopmuseum.org/greenwell,  or email agg@bishopmuseum.org.  Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden is Bishop Museum’s native plant arboretum, located 12 miles south of Kailua-Kona on Highway 11, just south of mile marker 110.

The 10th Annual Grow Hawaiian Festival is, presented by Hawai‘i Forest and Trail.   Support for this event  is also provided by Kūki‘o,  and Kealakekua Ranch, Ltd.  An award from the County of Hawai‘i Department of Research and Development and the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority funds the Guided Native Plant Walks.  Anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service for effective communication or a modification of policies and procedures to participate in the Hawaiian Plant Walks should contact Peter Van Dyke at 808-323-3318 at least two weeks before their planned visit.

Chocolate Lover’s Paradise – The Big Island Chocolate Festival is Coming Up!

The alluring, rich taste of chocolate, in both its sweet and savory forms, is showcased at the third annual Big Island Chocolate Festival (BICF) May 2-3 at The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i. Headlining the event is “Mr. Chocolate” Jacques Torres, Food Network celebrity from New York City, plus Derek Poirier of Valrhona USA, Donald Wressell of Guittard and Stanton Ho for Amoretti.

Big Island Chocolate FestivalThe two-day chocolate decadence opens with a student competition on Friday, followed by public culinary and agriculture-themed, hands-on seminars and demonstrations on Saturday. Fun culminates 6-10 p.m. May 3 with the festival gala in the Grand Ballroom—indulge at a host of sweet and savory culinary stations presented by top isle chefs, chocolatiers and confectioners.

Culinary stations will be vying for awards in a variety of categories judged by a panel of celebrity chefs led by Torres. Attendees can get in on the friendly voting by casting a ballot for the People’s Choice Award.

Chocolate Festival

Also on tap will be fine wines and handcrafted ales, chocolate sculptures, live entertainment, dancing and a silent auction. Presented by the Kona Cacao Association (KCA), event proceeds benefit the $150,000 “Equip the Kitchens” campaign for the future Hawai‘i Community College-Palamanui and efforts to build a community amphitheatre at the Waldorf-inspired Kona Pacific Public Charter School in Kealakekua.

“The Big Island Chocolate Festival is a fantasyland of chocolate,” says KCA President Farsheed Bonakdar. “It inspires our chefs, encourages our island farmers to grow cacao and shows our chocolatiers that chocolate can be a viable business.”

Early bird tickets for Hawai‘i’s premiere chocolate gala are $65 until sold out or through Feb. 28. Pre-sale tickets are $75 and will be $100 at the door. New this year is the VIP Fast Wine Pass with early event admission and personalized wine service. Buy tickets and find event details online at www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com. Questions? Phone 808-324-6100.

Chocolate Festival

Also available is an inclusive Chocolate Lovers package that includes a two-night’s stay at The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i, plus all festival activities at the ocean-side Four Diamond resort; contact info@BigIslandChocolateFestival.com. Attendees who want to stay at the resort during the festival can get a discounted room rate of $269 per night including daily breakfast for two and can book direct with the hotel at 808-885-2000 or 800-845-9905 and mention “Big Island Chocolate Festival.”

The Big Island Chocolate Festival is presented by the Kona Cacao Association, Inc. The mission and goal of KCA is to promote the cacao industry on the Big Island of Hawai‘i by presenting BICF as an educational and outreach opportunity for local cacao farmers, the hospitality industry and cacao enthusiasts. For information, visit www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com.

Land Exchange Next Step in Creating Central Oahu Agriculture Hub

State senators introduced this session land exchange legislation that would help protect agricultural and conservation lands, boost the agricultural industry and put the appropriate entities in the proper places to grow a better Hawai‘i. The measure is supported by eighteen lawmakers in the Hawai‘i State Senate, including the bill’s main sponsor Senator Donovan Dela Cruz (D- Mililani Mauka, Waipi‘o Acres, Wheeler, Wahiawā, Whitmore Village, and portion of Poamoho).

sb3065
The measure, Senate Bill 3065, Relating to Land Exchange, would allow the Department of Land and Natural Resources to exchange state-owned parcels in Kapolei for 20,000 acres of agricultural and conservation lands in Central O‘ahu. The lands, currently owned by the Castle & Cooke, surround the 1,207 acres of arable land purchased by the state for $13 million in 2012.
The land acquisition was part of a detailed plan for the future of Hawai‘i known as the Whitmore Project, an initiative to revitalize Hawai‘i’s local agriculture industry by bringing farmers and the state together to increase local food production, create jobs, engage in partnerships, and provide affordable housing.

Castle & Cooke has listed the land for sale at $175,000,000 and has also been supportive of the idea of a land exchange. The State currently owns land near areas where transit-oriented development is in the works.

“A land exchange with Castle & Cooke makes real sense here,” said Sen. Dela Cruz, “We have to look at all our options and think outside the box to help diversify Hawai‘i’s ag industry and preserve our lands. The state would spend little to no taxpayer money, and the exchange would allow for the appropriate entity to oversee smart development around transit plans and put the State in a place where it can provide opportunities for farmers and preserve lands.”

“Wahiawā can be an ag industrial hub,” he added. “These lands are up for sale and anything can happen to them. Do we want to see them parceled out and developed or do we want to see them as part of a plan that supports agriculture and our farmers?”

Innaugural Hawai’i Island Ranchers Dinner at Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai

Inspired by storied lands, Hawaii’s leaders in education, agriculture and culinary arts have cooked up a deliciously innovative collaboration in the 2014 Hawai‘i Island Ranchers Dinner at Sam Choy’s Kai Lānai, Friday, February 28, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. Presented by Choy and prepared by Executive Chef Scott Hiraishi, the Ranchers Dinner not only highlights local-grown foods and sustainable grass fed beef, but offers the chance for diners to meet and eat with the farmers, ranchers and chefs who bring “farm-to-fork” full circle.

Executive Chef

Executive Chef Scott Hiraishi.  Photo by Britten Traughber

The Ranchers Dinner is the first in a series of collaborative culinary-agriculture projects of Kamehameha School-Land Asset Division (KSLAD) in partnership with the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture. KSLAD manages 365,000 acres of Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate land, bequeathed for the education and betterment of her people by Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop in 1884. Of those, 160,935 acres are agricultural property on Hawai‘i Island alone.

“Two out of three Kona Coffee farms are on KS land,” said Land Asset Manager Les Apoliona, explaining that part of their mission is to support agricultural education, business planning, and farmer certification programs. Working to connect Hawai‘i Island food producers with skilled chefs also connects agriculture to hospitality and tourism. “It’s about relationships,” said Apoliona. “We are actively exploring various options, and looking at partnering for a sustainable Hawai‘i.”

Hiraishi is doing his best to further the concept. Hawai‘i born and raised, Hiraishi has worked alongside Choy for much of the last two decades, starting as young culinary student. When the iconic Sam Choy’s Kaloko location closed, Hiraishi expanded his career into resort service at the AAA 5-Diamond Four Seasons Resort Hualālai and the Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa at Keauhou Bay. Hiraishi has cooked for the International Food and Wine Travel Writers Welcome Reception and the James Beard Celebrity Chefs Tour Reception at Mauna Lani Resort, and was a featured chef at Taste of the Hawaiian Range.

In 2010 Hiraishi once again teamed up with Choy for his new Keauhou location, which is located on KS land. The connection became clear. Bringing the best food from the region to the tables of one of the region’s best restaurants completes the circle—supporting the vision of sustainable local agriculture that nurtures business and vice versa.

“I’ve learned so much from the entire experience,” said Hiraishi. “One of the most important things—to get the freshest ingredients you can—is to talk to the farmers and work with them. When you can’t find something specific they will go out and find it for you, or grow it for you.”

For the Ranchers Dinner, Hiraishi created a five-course plated feast with wine pairings that stars select cuts of versatile Hawai‘i Lowline Cattle Company beef, including “cook your own” Tenderloin with ishi yaki (Japanese hot stones) where guests may interact with Choy and Hiraishi. Also in the spotlight are creative preparations of Local-Style Oxtail Soup, Beef Tongue, Flank Steak, Rib-Eye, Short Ribs and more, served with Hāmākua Mushrooms, fresh vegetables from Living Aquaponics farm and other products sourced from local farmers markets. Dinner concludes with a smile, and Chef Scott’s Chocolate Macaroon “Cow Pie.”

Cost of the Ranchers Dinner is $75 per person which includes select wine pairings and a custom logo “Ag Bag” with sampling of ingredients used in the menu. Only 75 seats are available for the exclusive dining event and reservations are required. For more information, visit www.SamChoy.com, follow Ranchers Dinner at Sam Choy’s Kai Lānai on Facebook, or call 808-333-3434.

Big Island Police Still Conducting Marijuana Raids in Puna

One man has been charged and another released following their arrests during the execution of a marijuana search warrant last week in the Hawaiian Acres subdivision in Puna.

1/28/14 UPDATE: Vice officers served the search warrant Friday morning (January 24) at a home on Road 1 and recovered 51 marijuana plants [corrected number] (ranging in height from 1 to 3 feet), 168.5 grams of dried processed marijuana and drug paraphernalia.

Raymond Eastridge

Raymond Eastridge

Two 45-year-old residents, Raymond Eastridge and John Holloway, were arrested at the scene and taken to the South Hilo police cellblock while Vice detectives continued the investigation.

After conferring with prosecutors, Holloway was released without charges. Eastridge was charged with second-degree promoting marijuana, second-degree promoting a detrimental drug, third degree promoting a detrimental drug and possessing drug paraphernalia.

His bail was set at $7,250. He remained at the cellblock until his initial court appearance Monday afternoon (January 27).

Calling All Keiki Lemonade Makers – Lemonade Alley 2014

Lemonade Alley, an exciting, hands-on business program for kids, today announced its 2014 competition date and call for team applications. The BizGym Foundation program is in its fourth year of teaching budding keiki entrepreneurs, or “#Kidpreneurs,” business, financial literacy, and social good skills through a competition in which teams of kids sell lemonade to raise funds for charities of their choice.

lemonade alley“As entrepreneurial skills become increasingly important in our society, Lemonade Alley looks forward to providing Hawai‘i’s next generation with a positive experience that encourages them to make our state – and the world – a better place through sustainable business practices,” said Steve Sue, Chief Lemon Head of Lemonade Alley. “This year, we invite keiki big and small to paint the town yellow for a one-of-a-kind experience at the coolest lemonade sale in town!”

Over a month-long time period, participating Lemonade Alley teams concoct a lemonade recipe, design and build a stand where they can sell their lemonade, pitch their business on-stage, and select a charity of choice, culminating in a head-to-head competition where teams sell lemonade and raise money for their chosen charities. The winning teams go home with $1,000 in cash for their chosen charities, with additional cash prizes and awards also distributed at the competition.

Lemonade Alley 2014 team applications are due on Friday, Mar. 7 via mail to 3155 Alani Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822. The first 30 teams to submit applications will be admitted on a first come, first serve basis. The 2014 application form is available for download at www.lemonadealley.com.

Lemonade Alley will take place on Saturday, Apr. 12, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Pearlridge Center, host sponsor venue of Lemonade Alley 2014, at the Pearlridge parking lot between Uptown and Downtown. Lemonade Alley welcomes corporate sponsors, donors, and volunteers to support this year’s competition. For more information, visit www.lemonadealley.com,

Waterfalling Estate to Host UH-Hilo Tennis Exhibition

It’s a sporting venue like no other.  On February 8, athletes from the UH-Hilo Tennis team will put their skills to the test in exhibition matches held on a cliff-side court overlooking thundering waterfalls and panoramic ocean vistas.

Waterfalling Estate Tennis Court

Hosted at the 8-acre Waterfalling Estate in Ninole, the expo serves as a benefit fundraiser for the Richard and Ruth Matsuura Vulcan Tennis Endowed Scholarship.  The scholarship was named after the late state senator and his wife, a local pediatrician, in appreciation for their generous contributions to athletics and education on Hawai`i Island.

Waterfalling Estate
Senator Matsuura was a key figure in Hawai`i politics during the 1980s and 1990s, helping to promote geothermal energy in Puna, and the Natural Energy Lab in West Hawai`i. Though the senator passed away in 1997, Dr. Ruth Matsuura and her children have continued to play an active role in the Hilo community.
Richard and Ruth Matsumura

Richard and Ruth Matsuura

 The Matsuuras were key donors in the construction of the Haili Tennis Courts located at Hilo Intermediate School, and according to UH-Hilo tennis coach Karl Sloss, were “instrumental” in supporting the university’s tennis program in recent years.
“This endowment will help us work toward a fully-funded future for Vulcan Tennis,” said Sloss, who is also a volunteer member of Hui Kako`o Kenika, a nonprofit organization that promotes tennis on the Big Island.
The event, which runs from 3 pm to 6 pm, will feature a “best of five” world team tennis competition, along with light pupus, and live music by Lito Arkangel.
Waterfalling Estate Piano Room
Tickets are $25, and can be purchased in advance from the UH athletics ticket office or at the door. For more information, contact Karl Sloss at (842)-922-7221 or at ksloss@hawaii.edu.

Big Island Rep. Onishi Calls for Stronger Protections For Hawaii’s Farmers and Ranchers

Hawaii Island House of Representative Richard H.K. Onishi (Hilo, Keaau, Kurtistown, Pahala, Honoapu, Volcano) is calling for stronger protections for Hawaii’s farmers and ranchers by introducing a bill to strengthen Hawaii’s Right to Farm Act.

HB2506

Hawaii’s right-to-farm law is designed to protect and preserve agricultural operations by allowing farmers, who meet all legal requirements and use accepted farming management practices, protection from unreasonable controls on farming operations and from nuisance suits which might be brought against them.

The law also documents the importance of farming to the local community and State of Hawaii and puts non-farming rural residents on notice that generally accepted agricultural practices are reasonable activities to expect in farming areas.

“Like many other states, Hawaii has had to deal with encroaching urbanization and pressure it puts on our farms and agricultural lands,” Onishi said. “Unlike most states, Hawaii is an island with very limited space for agricultural endeavors. We’ve seen how hard it’s been to protect our ag lands and to keep them productive in the face of other pressing needs and priorities.

“But if we are interested in sustainability and moving Hawaii toward greater self-reliance, we will have to strike a better balance between our rural and urban needs. This measure is designed to do just that by protecting our local farmers and ranchers. They have a right to farm in the best way they see fit, as long as they follow legal and accepted agricultural practices, whether we’re talking about ranchers, poultry, hog, vegetable, flower and plant farmers.”

The public can participate in legislative discussions and follow the progress of the bill at http://capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=HB&billnumber=2506&year=2014

Free Carcasses: 4-Wheel Drive Vehicles Required

DLNR PLANS ANIMAL CONTROL ACTIVITIES IN PALILA HABITAT, Temporary closures set for Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, palila mitigation lands, and Kaohe Game Management Area

The Department of Land and Natural Resources’ (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) will conduct animal control activities specifically for trapping mouflon/feral sheep hybrids; staff hunting, and/or aerial shooting from helicopters for feral goats, feral sheep, mouflon and mouflon/feral sheep hybrids within palila critical habitat in the Mauna Kea Forest Reserve (Unit A), palila mitigation lands, and the Ka’ohe Game Management Area (Unit G) on the island of Hawai’i.

Aerial shooting is required for compliance with the federal court order mandating the removal of sheep and goats from critical habitat for palila, a bird endemic to Hawai’i.

Control schedules are January 22 and 23, 2014; February 5 and 6; 2014 and March 19 and 20, 2014.

Public access to Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, palila mitigation lands, the Ka’ohe Game Management Area and Mauna Kea Hunter Access Road will be restricted and allowed BY PERMIT ONLY for animal salvage purposes on the following dates:

7 a.m. January 22, February 5, and March 19, 2014
6 a.m. January 23, February 6, and March 20, 2014

These actions are pursuant to Hawai’i Administrative Rules Chapters 13-130-19 and 13-104-23(a) (3). The Mauna Kea Observatory Road will remain open.

The temporary closure is needed to minimize the dangers of incompatible uses in the forest area and safely conduct animal control activities. To implement the closure, both the Hale Pohaku and Kilohana gated entrances to Unit A and G and the gate behind Mauna Kea State Recreation Area will be locked/reopened as follows:

Locked 7 p.m. January 21, 2014, and reopened 7 p.m. January 23, 2014
Locked 7 p.m. February 4, 2014, and reopened 7 p.m. February 6, 2014
Locked 7 p.m., March 18, 2014, and reopened 7 p.m. March 20, 2014

Copies of the map illustrating the area subject to aerial shooting on these dates are available for inspection at the Division of Forestry and Wildlife Office.

Due to high public participation, telephone call-ins to the DOFAW Kamuela Office at (808) 887-6063 for receiving salvage permits will be conducted up to 10 a.m. the day before each shoot day. One permit will be issued per call per vehicle for one day only.

Applicants can have their names added to a stand-by list for additional days, should all slots not be filled by other applicants. No standbys waiting at the gates will be allowed access. The driver, occupants, vehicle license plate, and make/model of vehicle are needed when calling in.

A maximum of 15 permitted vehicles will be allowed at the Pu‘u Ko‘ohi location and 10 permitted vehicles at the Kaluamakani location.

Carcasses taken during the shoot will be available to the permitted public for salvage at the following locations (4-wheel drive vehicle are required, and access permits will be issued). There is no guarantee that animals will be able to be salvaged.

The following meat salvage locations are subject to change:

  • On January 22, February 5, and March 19, 2014, at Pu’u Ko’ohi. Permittees must meet at Mauna Kea State Park at 7 a.m. sharp.
  • On January 23, February 6, and March 20, 2014, at Kaluamakani. Permittees must meet across from the Waimea Veterinary office on Mana Road at 6 a.m. sharp.

Contact the Division of Forestry and Wildlife in Hilo at (808) 974-4221 or in Kamuela at (808) 887-6063 for additional details regarding meat salvage or access permits.